With the holiday season just weeks away, thousands of people in the Northern California area are turning to food banks. Rancho Cordova Food Locker, located at 10497 Coloma Road, serves everyone, and this year, Director Lindan Condon said he has seen an increase in minority groups and refugees seeking food aid. “Our Hispanic speakers are all volunteers and thank goodness we have them because now we can communicate. I think a lot of our Hispanic population was a little scared to come in. They couldn’t read our we couldn’t not tell them what we wanted,” Condon said. Since 2018, they’ve served food to about 250,000 people. Their peak year was in 2020 with 58,255 people served. This year, that number is almost reached. to 53,650 people served. The organization expects thousands more to show up for Thanksgiving and other holidays. Assistance for homeless residents is not being tracked as they have a no-questions-asked policy questions. Condon recalls serving between 40 and 70 families a day. Last month, they broke a one-day record after 180 families showed up at their location. That includes about 40 people who are refugees.” Our Ukrainians, Russians, Afghans – they have nothing yet. They arrived here three days ago. They come here for food and if you don’t have anything, we’re gonna find a way to give it to you,” Condon said. This Friday they served around 160 households, including a last-minute young group of friends who showed up, all from Russia. They said they fled the country for fear of persecution for their stance against the war in Ukraine. Nadia Bulagakova is one of the few at the bank who can translate for these refugees. She has officially worked at the food locker for three weeks now and took this job because she is passionate about helping people like her. they need – and I know this because I have been here for five months and I know they need – a lot of houses, not just food,” Bulagakova said. So, as demand on their site is on the rise, they say their needs have extended beyond food aid and need volunteers who can translate into multiple languages.

With the holiday season just weeks away, thousands of people in the Northern California area are turning to food banks.

Rancho Cordova Food Locker, located at 10497 Coloma Road, serves everyone, and this year manager Lindan Condon said he has seen an increase in the number of minority groups and refugees seeking food assistance.

“Our Spanish speakers are all volunteers and thank God we have them because now we can communicate. couldn’t tell them what we wanted,” Condon said.

Since 2018, they have served food to around 250,000 people. Their peak year was in 2020 with 58,255 people served. This year, this number is almost reached at 53,650 people served. The organization expects thousands more to show up for Thanksgiving and other holidays. Assistance for homeless residents is not tracked as they have a no questions asked policy.

Condon remembers serving between 40 and 70 families a day. Last month, they broke a one-day record after 180 families showed up at their location. This includes about 40 people who are refugees.

“Our Ukrainians, Russians, Afghans, they don’t have anything yet. They arrived here three days ago. They come here for food and if you don’t have anything, we’ll find a way to give it to you Condon said.

This Friday, they served around 160 households, including a last-minute young group of friends who showed up, all from Russia. They said they fled the country for fear of persecution for their stance against the war in Ukraine.

Nadia Bulagakova is one of the few in the bank who can translate for these refugees. She has officially worked at the Food Locker for three weeks now and took this job because she is passionate about helping people like her.

“So they’ve lost jobs, they’ve lost businesses, they’ve only taken what they could take with them and, of course, they need – and I know that because I’ve been here for five months. and I know they need – lots of houses, not just food,” Bulagakova said.

So, as demand on their site is on the rise, they say their needs have extended beyond food aid and need volunteers who can translate into multiple languages.